Designing Your Uplevel Environment

This week we are discussing an often-overlooked but significant element of the uplevel process: environment. Before we can truly begin to uplevel we need to design an environment that will support that change, both internally and externally.

I recently worked with a client who wanted to double his company but realized that his environment—both internal and external—did not support it. On the surface, it was obvious that he needed a bigger office to accommodate the growth. What wasn’t so obvious was how important it was to complete projects and relationships that no longer aligned with the new direction he was taking. When he began doing that he was then able to free up time and energy to focus on the bigger game he wanted to play. He also made space for new relationships with people who were already operating at that next level—people who could help him work toward his goal.

The first step is to work with your internal environment - to look within yourself and deliberately create space within yourself for your uplevel. People often want to play a bigger game and have a vision of what that might look like, but lack the time and space to really listen to themselves. Your own intuition is invaluable and rarely emerges unless you have space to listen. Looking within will yield the insights and information you need to ensure that you are ready to embark upon your uplevel.   

So begin designing your “internal environment” so that you have space to:

  • Reflect and explore
  • Plan and prepare
  • And finally, launch your new project

Equally important is creating the external space for your uplevel. Here are some external essentials to prepare your environment for that next level:

  1. Clear time in your schedule. Make sure that you aren’t beginning your uplevel journey with a calendar already filled to capacity.  Even if you can only schedule one or two hours a week to work on your uplevel project, it will make a big difference.
  2. Prime your workspace. Clear out old papers, digitize your files—do whatever you need to do to create the physical space necessary for your new project.
  3. Consider your relationships. Wrap things up with colleagues, friends, and family so that you are free to focus your energy on upleveling.
  4. Establish better daily habits. Spend your time on things that energize you and let go of practices that distract you or cause undue stress.

I recently worked with a client who wanted to double his company but realized that his environment—both internal and external—did not support it. On the surface, it was obvious that he needed a bigger office to accommodate the growth. What wasn’t so obvious was how important it was to complete projects and relationships that no longer aligned with the new direction he was taking. When he began doing that he was then able to free up time and energy to focus on the bigger game he wanted to play. He also made space for new relationships with people who were already operating at that next level—people who could help him work toward his goal.

Of course, creating the internal and external space to uplevel is easier said than done but it’s a necessary step. You need that space to get the momentum to launch something new. We will continue talking about the internal and external elements of upleveling in the near future but for now just remember: Set up your environment for success.

Weekly Uplevel Practice

This week’s practice asks important questions to help you prepare your internal and external environment:

  • Where do you need to make more space so you can truly give your uplevel project the focus and energy it will need?  
  • Is it more internal space that is needed? Or is it external space?  
  • What can you do today—in the next 24 hours—to help you get more internal or external space?

As you ask these questions, notice your somatic (whole body) response.  What sensations are you experiencing? Where are you contracting your body?  Where does your body feel open and relaxed? These somatic responses will provide valuable insights.